Sunday, 24 Jan 2021
Large, purple jellyfish washed up on Muscat shores recently. While beachgoers are hesitant to swim, experts have varying opinions on the potential dangers.

Beachgoers wary of jellyfish washed ashore

The presence of jellyfish is a all-natural phenomenon and it happens as a outcome of algal bloom, which they feed on, mentioned Dr Lubna al Kharusi, director common, Fisheries Research at the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries (MoAF).

She added, “We had extremely dense plankton final week, so their presence in big numbers is anticipated.

“The regularity of this occurrence is hard to predict due to climate change. We advise people to avoid swimming in the sea for the time being.”

Meanwhile, a senior member of Muscat Triathlon Club told Muscat Daily, “Of course, we have to keep our wits about us while swimming, but in general, the jellyfish aren’t too much of a nuisance. I haven’t had problems, and I haven’t heard reports from other members of the club.”

Keith Holt, owner of Global Scuba, mentioned, “While it is difficult to predict with excellent accuracy, my expertise is jellyfish abound when the season adjustments from summer time to winter or vice versa.
“Contact with the purple jellyfish would outcome in itchy skin. Thankfully, the much more hazardous box jellyfish, which appears like a floating plastic bag, is seldom noticed in Oman’s waters.”

Ministry’s note of caution

In mid-August, the Marine Sciences and Fisheries Centre at MoAF cautioned beachgoers on the spread of jellyfish in specific beaches of Oman.

“The sting by the creature may cause rashes. People should be careful while swimming where jellyfish are present. Even though there are a lot of harmless jellyfish, some of them may sting and cause irritation and redness of the skin. Some may be just painful while others may be poisonous,” the MoAF statement mentioned.

Information Source: Muscat Daily

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